Stella Hamberg. das ist das

Current

Stella Hamberg. das ist das

27/11/2021 — 04/05/2024

Stella Hamberg, das ist das, 2015/2021, courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin, © artist, photo: PUNCTUM/Alexander Schmidt
Stella Hamberg, das ist das, 2015/2021, courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin, © artist, photo: PUNCTUM/Alexander Schmidt
Stella Hamberg, das ist das, 2015/2021, courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin, © artist, photo: PUNCTUM/Alexander Schmidt
Stella Hamberg, das ist das, 2015/2021, courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin, © artist, photo: PUNCTUM/Alexander Schmidt
Stella Hamberg, das ist das, 2015/2021, courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin, © artist, photo: PUNCTUM/Alexander Schmidt
Stella Hamberg, das ist das, 2015/2021, courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin, © artist, photo: PUNCTUM/Alexander Schmidt
Stella Hamberg, das ist das, 2015/2021, courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin, © artist, photo: PUNCTUM/Alexander Schmidt
Stella Hamberg, das ist das, 2015/2021, courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin, © artist, photo: PUNCTUM/Alexander Schmidt

Anyone approaching the entrance to the MdbK from Katharinenstraße looks into the ripped maw of a giant predatory fish. Inevitably, the sight is reminiscent of a gigantic shark whose dentition is presented on a pedestal. The dentition is presented like a primeval find and is only revealed to the viewer by walking around and cautiously approaching it. This is the bronze sculpture das ist das (roughly translated: this is this), a good 1.20 m high, by the Berlin-based sculptor Stella Hamberg.

The surface, like the overall form of the sculpture, is all vibration and movement. The matt, dark black-fired patina of the bronze emphasises the raw and material-like quality. The work reveals contrasts - the jaw with its pointed teeth seems to persist between liveliness and fossilised rigidity. Even though the body of the monster is missing, the torn open jaws suggest unrestrained and dangerously imminent power.

Art should hit and touch, it can be bulky and "bite". At the same time, it is fascinating in its possibilities: a piece of space becomes a sea or a dream image and invites you to change your perspective by looking through the rows of teeth. Experiencing art here becomes a physical experience, as the work with its multiple views encourages interaction.

The work is part of the series Neutron, for which Stella Hamberg takes her reference or starting point in natural forms. Following essential positions of modernism, especially Rodin, the artist - sometimes more and sometimes less - detaches the motif from the object in favour of rhythm, mass and opening. Abstract formations emerge that are suitable for walking around without revealing their secrets.

Stella Hamberg (* 1975) studied sculpture at the Dresden University of Fine Arts and was a master student of Prof. Martin Hornert until 2006. She currently lives and works in Berlin. In 2006, she received the Karl Schmidt-Rotluff Scholarship of the German National Academic Foundation and in 2018 she was awarded the Maria Werefkin Prize. Currently, a major retrospective of her work is on view at the Arp Museum (Remagen) until 27.02.2022.

The bronze das ist das is expected to be on display in front of the MdbK until May 2024.

Stella Hamberg, das ist das, 2015/2021, courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin, © artist, photo: PUNCTUM/Alexander Schmidt
Stella Hamberg, das ist das, 2015/2021, courtesy Galerie EIGEN + ART Leipzig/Berlin, © artist, photo: PUNCTUM/Alexander Schmidt